Table Of Contents

2.1. An installation tutorial for people with very little time

A minimal quasardb setup requires deploying the quasardb daemon on a single server and making sure that the client can access it. In this tutorial security will be not be enabled.

Important

This tutorial is based on a manual installation of quasardb, that is, we will expand an archive and configure manually the daemon. For many platform we provide a packaged installer and it is recommended to use this packaged installer in production (see Server Administration).

You may need license to run this tutorial (see License).

2.1.1. Installing a quasardb daemon in three steps

Without a configuration file

  1. Download the appropriate server for your platform (FreeBSD, Linux or Windows) from quasardb download site. All download information is in your welcome e-mail.

  2. Install the server

    • On FreeBSD and Linux you just need to expand the tarball.
    • On Windows it comes as a zip file or as an automated setup, which includes both the 32-bit and the 64-bit version.
  3. Run the daemon from the command line.

    The command is:

    qdbd --security=false
    

    If you have a licence file:

    qdbd --license-file=qdb_license.txt --security=false
    

Note

On Windows, the installer creates and runs a quasardb service listening on the default port (2836) on the local address.

With a configuration file

  1. Download the appropriate server for your platform (FreeBSD, Linux or Windows) from quasardb download site. All download information is in your welcome e-mail.

  2. Install the server

    • On FreeBSD and Linux you just need to expand the tarball.
    • On Windows it comes as a zip file or as an automated setup, which includes both the 32-bit and the 64-bit version.
  3. Generate a default configuration file using the command line.

    The command is:

    qdbd --gen-config > qdbd_config.conf
    

    The daemon will by default listen on the IPv4 localhost, on the port 2836, persist its content to the disk asynchronously, limit itself to 1,000,000 entries, and will not log at all. See quasardb daemon for more configuration options.

  4. Optional: Edit the configuration file so it points to your license_file.

    "user":
    {
        "daemon": false,
        "license_file": "qdb_license.txt"
    }
    

    Providing an empty string “” runs qdbd in evaluation mode.

  5. Run the daemon from the command line.

    The command is:

    qdbd -c qdbd_config.conf --security=false
    

2.1.2. Using the quasardb shell to test your quasardb installation

The quasardb shell offers an interactive mode from which the user can enter commands. The name of the binary is qdbsh and it is included in the utils package.

  1. Run qdbsh.

    The command is:

    qdbsh
    

    By default qdbsh will connect to a quasardb daemon using the default settings of localhost, port 2836. If you have edited the qdbd configuration file already, for example to make the qdbd daemon run on 192.168.1.1 and listen on port 303 - you will run qdbsh as such:

    qdbsh qdb://192.168.1.1:303
    

    See quasardb shell for detailed configuration options.

  2. Add and get an entry from the server:

    qdbsh> blob_put entry thisismycontent
    qdbsh> blob_get entry
    thisismycontent
    qdbsh> exit
    

Type help to get a list of available commands. See quasardb shell for more information.

2.1.3. Monitoring your installation from a web server

quasardb comes with a web bridge in the form of an HTTP daemon. This web bridge can be used to monitor your quasardb daemon remotely. It is updated in real time so the information displayed by the web server is as fresh as it can be. The name of the binary is qdb_httpd and it is included in the server package.

All information is available in both JSON and JSONP format.

  1. Generate a default configuration file for the web bridge.

    The command is:

    qdb_httpd --gen-config > qdb_httpd_default_config.conf
    

    By default, the web bridge will listen on localhost, port 8080. It will connect to a quasardb daemon using the default settings of localhost, port 2836. See quasardb web server for detailed configuration options.

  2. Run the web bridge.

    The command is:

    qdb_httpd -c qdb_httpd_default_config.conf
    
  3. Test it from a browser

    The primary node monitoring interface is an HTML5 web interface. If using the default settings, simply point your browser to:

    http://127.0.0.1:8080/view/index.html
    

    You can also access the statistics in JSON format. The global statistics URL is /global_status:

    http://127.0.0.1:8080/global_status
    

    If you want the content in JSONP format, the URL becomes:

    http://127.0.0.1:8080/global_status?daemon=127.0.0.1:2836&callback=MyCallBack
    
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